A silhouette of a young woman with a ponytail sings, her image behind a lightly brushed lavender, ivory and sea green. Her face falls forward and then moves back, the background tilting.

Her head is centered around a black-and-white checkered background with a moving lavender and sea green circle. Then, the screen splits with two different and backgrounds. One woman dances in the checkered background while another dances in a black background with fuschia pink stripes. The background changes once the women join together, starting from the lavender to a royal purple.

The circle now stands for the sun as two women dance by it. On the sides, two womens’ heads are in place of the mountains. Eventually, more women stand on separate mountains underneath a sea green sky.

A man and a woman dance as an invisible brush paints squiggly lines and geometric shapes over them. The screen tilts as a woman’s mouth, who is drawn into the sky, sings. Over black water and a full moon, women, drawn in white shadows, dance. A totem pole made of the woman’s mouth sings. The screen goes black.

The background changes from various pastel colors. Underneath the blue striped sun, two women dance. The multiple women dance on the mountains again. A square is drawn and it becomes a painting hanging on a wall between two stairways. On both stairways, women dance.

The women are dancing in cards, windows, and ovals. All are turned into moving paintings on the wall.

Rating: 5/5

It is awesome! The 80s style colors and designs are amazing. It’s a modern update, while bringing back some of the nostalgia from the time. The silhouette style, which is overused, has a genuine place in the video. Seeing the actual people would’ve taken away from it. The animation, moving from the silhouettes to drawn figures, is seamless. There is a lot detail put into it, mostly when the woman’s face becomes the sun. The women’s face is shaded. It’s as though it was drawn with charcoal. However, when the screen pans to the women dancing, it’s as though a tiny piece of white chalk was used.

     Director: Dan Streit Year: 2015