After finishing their walk in the forest, Andrew and Alex walk towards their convertible. Alex starts the car and they begin their drive back home. Andrew looks at his phone, which is playing the song.

Meanwhile, Daya is in the forest, wounded from her breakup. She wanders through the tall grass, trying not to hurt herself. She puts her hands on her head and gathers her courage.

Still driving, Andrew has fallen asleep with his headphones on. Alex mentions that he is hearing noises to Andrew and he wakes up. Seeing Daya in the middle of the road, Alex stops and looks at Andrew to see if he knew about this.

Four other women of joined Daya. Andrew and Alex get out of the car, thinking maybe they should say something. But after being met with glares, they decide to get back in the car and leave.

With their arms, the women bounce the car back and forth, up and down. One of the woman asks Daya if she’s ok but she pushes her hand away and turns her back. She has to keep her resolve. The car continues to bounce. One of the other women touches her face, offering support.

Daya closes her eyes, putting her hands over head. The pain won’t stop. Finally, Daya calms down some and the car stops, titled on its left side. Alex lets out a sigh of relief. However, it’s too soon. Daya waves her hands in the air, lifting them from their seats. She sees them hanging in the air, the shock in their eyes. It’s about time they literally feel what’s been inside her for weeks. She looks away from the car. Some of the pain has gone.

As it approaches nightfall, Andrew and Alex still remain in the air.

          Rating: 4/5

Andrew and Alex are willing to be the bad guys in the video. There’s no romantic triangle or epic love story. It’s Daya trying to come to terms with her pain and letting it all out by confronting them. They give Daya her moment, which is the most important. Daya, herself subverts the cliché some by not tearing into them or getting violent. She simply raises hands. In turn, they accept their punishment and do not fight it. Given the fact it’s a male group, having a video featuring a woman showing her anger and not being shamed by it, is progressive.

Thank you to Ayla Brewster. Edited to correct my mix-up, clarifying her question.

    Director: Marcus Kuhne Year: 2016