Outside a studio built city, a Ferrari is in the road. A person with a pixellated runs. A few seconds later, people in white denim suits run. Iggy Azaela, at the wheel, gestures to the music, resigned. The pixellated women, now in a green track suit, steps in front of the car and Azalea looks up into her rearview mirror.

She begins doing donuts, leaving two circle marks on the pavement and then continues driving down the road. The woman’s pixellated face stares into the car again.

At the airport, she hands over her ticket, gets it verified and then rolls her suitcase into security. The security officer puts her bag on the conveyor belt. Its contents show through the scanner. She stands in the corner, wearing a black, sleek jumpsuit and raises her hands up. The security officer scans her body. The screen shows a skeleton. Her silver suitcase is opened up. The woman looks through her spray cans and lets Azalea go. She rolls her suitcase to the elevator.

At the hanger, a guy sprays a “D” on the airplane while she sits on the steps, wearing a clear jacket with a white dress top and tights underneath. A woman finishes writing on another section of the plane. Using her black spray can, she paints over the “I” again. Meanwhile, another woman adds another layer of print to a crown on top of the first “D.”

Changing into black biker shorts, a shredded black coat with smudged white stains and matching knee-high boots, she and her dancers perform a choreographed routine. Fashion-wise, the dancers outshine her with a stripped down version of Azalea’s outfit. The women still wear the biker shorts. However, they have a black bralette, with a black coat (that seems to be fitted like a cape). Some of the women dancers also have a mesh crop top version also. The men have a casual version, their shorts resembling track pants and a long-sleeved t-shirt with tennis shoes.

Azalea does more donuts in the hanger.

Police cars arrive at the hanger, their sirens blaring. They run inside immediately. A female police officer pulls Azalea by the arm up the stairs of the plane as another police officer follows behind her. They put her in a seat and she pouts. The other dancers start to run off and a police officer grabs the one girl’s arm but doesn’t bother to chase after her. The police officer grabs her arm and she shakes it off. Another dancer gets arrested and Azalea starts getting scared. The woman, whose face is pixellated, sits back in the seat while Azalea says nothing.

The dancers hug their arms to their the chest, knowing they are smarter than Azalea since none of them got caught.

 

Rating: 1/5

The only good things about the music video is the catsuit. It belongs in a modern heist movie. The main fault of the video is there always seems to be an inkling that something is about to happen and nothing really does.

The humorless city, built-in neutral colors and fine edges, is stylized in what seems to be a dystopian state. Technology seems to be a force but not enough attention is given to it. Everyone wears white and Azalea drives and drive, numb to what is going on.

Then, she enters the airport and goes through security. Fear and paranoia underlay it while she keeps her expression stern. But it’s spray cans she’s carrying. What’s the plan?

Oh, it’s just revenge on the airline. Maybe they her promised her food on her last flight and she didn’t have anything? Maybe the flight attendant didn’t addressed by Amethyst and not Iggy as requested? Either way, the vandalizing is petty, bush league behavior.

Azalea, however, seems to have lost confidence she had. The larger-than-life personality she displayed has dimmed, which makes the vandalizing more pointed.

Director: Fabien Montique  Year: 2016