Against a blue brick wall, water drips from a faucet and slides through the corners, leading to the ground.

Sitting on a crate, Shania Twain sits with the teen and children violinists.

On the ground, people dance a jig, splashing water as they step on the ground. She stands in the center, spinning and clapping to the music. She gestures to her chest as the water sprinkles her.

She puts her hands on the shoulders of two dancers and joins them in their jig.

In black-and-white, she touches her face as her image fades into the screen, turning the dancers violet. She continues to clap and spin.

She points out her hand. In her individual shot against the autumnal brick, she raises her hand over her face in a good-natured manner. The dancers separate into two lines and then join together again.

In her individual shot, she puts her hands in her front of her face and closes her eyes, letting her frustration out.

Back in black-and-white, her image fades into the screen and turns the dancers violet again.

The sprinklers turn on, drenching the violinists, the dancers and her. After joining in their routine, she claps her hands and kicks her feet in the water. The sprinklers turn off.

 

Rating: 3/5

 At one point in the late 90s, Riverdance was ubiquitous. There were ads on television for the shows. Michael Flatley was a household name. “Lord of the Dance” became a meme. However, it didn’t quite reach Macarena level in the United States and was short-lived.

Out of the context from the era, the routine blends in seamlessly with the music. Even without it being a trend, it would be the next logical conclusion as something fresh and new to do.

 She has an easygoing personality and a high level of patience. When most people would be clenching their jaw and stamping their foot, she grins and then lets it go. Although she is in the center, the dancers are still able to get noticed. She even moves out of the way to allow them to separate.

 The video has a benefit of latching onto a trend that is associated with the decade, but doesn’t dominate it. Although it looks familiar watching it, it’s something that has to be looked up before it connects.

Director: Larry Jordan  Year: 1997