A cherry red convertible drives down the desert. On the opposite side, a bus makes a stop and Marie gets out.

From the mirror, Per and Marie perform, their bodies stretched out.

Sitting on top of the convertible as they drive through the desert, Per and Marie rock out on their guitars.

At the train tracks, Per and Marie stand as the scenery speeds by. Marie puts her hands over her eyes as the trains rolls past. The train collides with Marie.

At a toy carnival, a giant chimpanzee plays the cymbals. A carousel spins in the background.

Marie leans against the bus. Per plays to the bus.

On the wing of a plane, Per continues to play the guitar while Marie sits.

Behind some machinery, Marie thrusts her elbows.

The plane travels over the city. Marie stands up on the wing, shouting as the skyline becomes a blur and twists.

At night, they ride on top of the car. The clasp their fists in congratulations.

On the wing, Per drops his guitar. Then, on the ground, he is there to catch it.

As they perform by the overpass, the giant toy chimpanzee plays the cymbals.

The convertible drives past the bus. The bus door closes and remains parked.

 

Rating: 3/5

Playing a guitar on top of a convertible, with a gentle breeze and a bright sun beating down, is pure rock star. Marie, though, gets really into it. She has the sneer going and raises it up after a riff. After the guitar is gone, she tries to steady herself.

 The other form of transportation that really works is the plane. Again, Marie treats it as though she is on top of a mountain. She crosses her legs and gets comfortable. She even dances.

However, the train does not. Like the airplane, they rely on background screen to portray it. Even though it’s sped up, it doesn’t differ much from when INXS did the same thing in “Mediate.” With INXS, they each stood at the train track and then at the end, the train came by and they walked into it. It signified something important, that a change was necessary. Here, it as a means as to look cool.

The toy train set is out of place. The car, airplane, and the train all head for the freedom of the road. The train set is limited, continues in a circle and remains where it is. With childhood, there are rules to follow. Eventually, the toys have to be put away and it’s time to be responsible. It’s odd, considering the song is about avoiding reality for a day and taking off somewhere.

Director: Doug Freel  Year: 1991