In black-and-white, Kaya Stewart walks onto the stage and announces that she’s ready. She begins to stamp the floor, causing a minor eruption.

A braided boy twirls, his muscled arms raised.

She touches her heart and the minor eruptions begin again.

A skater boy walks, skateboard in arm and a flannel shirt around his waist.

A choir appears on stage.

An athlete appears, rotating his basketball from each hand, his body full of tattoos.

A quiet boy with full hair to his shoulders, wearing a black leather vest runs his hand over a lit match.

She touches her heart again, causing the minor eruptions to ensue again.

A boy, with his tipped hat and tank top exhales smoke.

She bends down, disappearing into the black and then reappears, putting her arms on each side of her, her face obscured from any light.

The choir appears for a second.

Obscured in the black, she stamps the floor again and then appears in the light.

The choir appears for a half a second.

The braided boy spray paints the air in mountainous waves.

The quiet boy looks mysterious and a whole lot of trouble all at once.

She touches her heart again and fades into the black and shows up again, holding onto the collar of her jacket.

Skater boy pours bottled water over his head.

She walks away from the stage.

The guy, who was smoking, catches his hat in the air.

Rating: 1/5

Kaya Stewart needs to find a better match of boys. Most importantly she has to stay far, far away from the quiet one. Considering he was playing with a lit match with hardly any expression on his face at all raises a stadium full of flags.

Nonetheless, the athlete seems like a good guy but mainly as a friend to her. Skater boy seems shy and a bit afraid of girls at this point in his life. She would likely be too much for him. She might think of braided boy as competition, fueling her artistic insecurities. The guy with the tipped hat and cigarette in his mouth seems to be the one who would suit her best. He seems sophisticated, as though he plays both jazz and rap clubs. A love of art exists, as he exhibits a worldly aura.

The constant stomping and pained expressions from Stewart get repetitive as the choir (which had to cost a decent amount of money to hire) only gets split seconds of screen time. It’s a waste, given too much spent is spent on Stewart staying in place, repeating the same steps over and over, complete with pained expression as she bends down, touching her knees.

The video presents Stewart with options, trying to create a mystery of which boy has her heart. Despite its lofty aspirations, it’s a pretentious version of The Bachelorette introductions, with each guy having a ploy to stand out and remain in the running for the first impression rose at the end of the evening.

Director: Jean-Baptiste Mondino Year: 2015