In black-and-white, Stacey Q receives applause from her manager and assistant after a concert. Before the concert, the makeup artist brushes her chin. As her stylist fixes strands of her hair, she rolls her eyes as she talks about forgetting her purse earlier in the day. She performs on stage and blows a kiss to the audience.

On a stage, with a white background, she dances, wearing a halter top with oranges on it and black leggings. However, the right leg continues the pattern. Next, she’s wearing a sapphire blue dress and then a white lace blouse, white cardigan, white skirt and some loose crown of flowers mixed in her hair.

After performing in concert in black-and-white, she’s back on stage wearing a sunset orange bikini top and a blended sarong wrapped around her hips. She switches between the halter top with the orange print to the sunset orange bikini and then the white lace outfit.

In black-and-white, she sings into the microphone, bending her head back. Then it returns to color with the same sequence of outfits. As she twirls, more of the sapphire sequined dress can be seen.

In black-and-white, she talks over some concerns with her manager. The stylist continues to fix her hair.

Back on stage, she dances around wearing the sapphire sequined dress. Then, the orange print is seen again. She tips her sunglasses down to her nose. All the outfits are seen together in a sequence. In the orange print halter top, she bobs her head as she holds up two fingers. She dances away from the camera in the sunset orange bikini.

Rating: 4/5

80s fashion on the whole is deemed as hideous as any current Moschino collection. Fashion magazines quickly bring up shoulder pads, leg warmers and acid-washed jeans as the worst styles. However, Stacey Q’s “Two Of Hearts” is forward in its approach, sticking to classic looks and solid, restrained colors.

The sapphire sequined dress, with its double straps, would be a great for a night out with the girls, but not too late. It has a responsible elegance to it, meant to be worn for than once. Meanwhile, the white lace outfit could be sold at Free People. With the loose crown, it’s as though she’s Greek goddess rebelling against her predetermined destiny. The sunset orange bikini, with its fringe on the sarong, is by far the most current.

The orange splattered print with one matching legging, though, is the misstep. Its discernible pattern is mostly uneven circles. Without being seen up close, it’s like the bumpy oranges were rejected from the grocer and sent back. Solid black leggings would’ve tempered the garishness a little but the pattern continues onto to one leg, seemingly as though the other was cut off.

Director: Peter Lippman Year: 1986