Against a cream-colored background, a mummy’s tomb stands on the stage. It opens to a female mummy with her arms crossed over her chest. Howard Jones steps in front of the tomb and points toward a portrait of a young woman sitting on an easel. He walks to the screen wearing a fuchsia coat splashed with multiple blobs of color and then leans against a television.

He holds a film reel in front of his face, distorting it and then sits on a cushioned backseat of a car. After tearing up several days off a calendar, he tosses it over his shoulder.

A mummy couple hold hands as take their dog on a walk in the park. Jones does a double take as he passes by them. At home, the female mummy kisses her husband. The husband carries his suitcase and finds a cab. Jones slumps his shoulders, frustrated that another cab is unavailable.

Back on stage, Jones shreds photos and then pretends to saw off a headboard. The mummies try on clothes in a store. Over dinner, they toast to themselves. Through the window, Jones rolls his eyes. They take a walk on the bridge and buy tickets to a show. Jones sees them and shakes his head. At the market, the husband buys her fresh flowers.

Jones taps the tomb as though it were a drum. The wife notices a police officer and they ask for directions. They play racquetball and then have ice cream for dinner. Against the cream-colored background, Jones claps his hands. They walk around the city, eating their ice cream. Jones laughs and then walks off the side of the stage.

Rating: 1/5

Howard Jones has given up on love. The bitterness rankles him each time he passes by a happy couple. He smirks as he sees them cuddle on the train or share an inside joke, knowing the butterflies will die soon and they will hate each other in a few more months.

An adorable mummy couple in particular irks him. He runs into them often in the city, buying groceries from the farmer’s market or waiting in line for a show. It sickens him to see them dote on another. He views them as attention-hungry people who have lost any concept of reality, believing Halloween is every day of the year.

Jones’ mocking of the mummy couple undermines the sweet relationship they have, chipping away at them for being the symbol of true love. His disdain for the mummies recasts them as a joke, ridiculing them for their socially awkward displays of affection.

Director: N/A Year: 1989

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