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A male Sasquatch cuts his bagel and eats his breakfast on his patio. He looks at himself in the mirror and then drives off to work. At the office he slides through two co-workers as he carries his coffee and returns to his cubicle. He sits on the stool in the break room, drinking his coffee.

Back at home, he brushes his teeth and checks his Tinder account. He sees a young woman has sent hm a message. He blows her a kiss while talking to her on Facetime. Over the weekend, he continues to talk to her as he fishes. During one of their talks, he cuts out a red paper heart for her. She texts him if she can meet him in person the following Tuesday. He suggests the weekend. She replies, “I can’t wait!”

At home, he dances in his kitchen and continues to talk to her. He dances on a rock as the sun sets and sends her pictures of himself. Saturday morning, he drives through an arch declaring “BigFoot Stay Away.” A man sits on the side of the road with a sign stating “No Squatches.” He stops for gas and pulls the Beware Sasquatch sign from the pump. In the evening, he passes a warning that it’s a BigFoot area.

The car sputters and stalls a block away from her home. He hits his steering wheel and spots two hunters in his rearview mirror. Glancing over his shoulder, he sees two more hunters approaching. They shoot at him as he runs out his truck. In the forest, he holds his phone up and taps it as he tries to get a signal.

He finds her house and plucks some flowers from her front yard. His eyes widen as he sees the mounted heads of bears and wolves on her wall. He holds his hands to his face as she hits him with an axe. He walks up in her backyard, chained to the ground. Turning around, he sees a female Sasquatch living in a cage. She blows him a kiss. He tears the chains of his ankles and breaks the cage. He takes her by the hand and they run off.

They ride a motorcycle together.

Rating: 5/5

The male Sasquatch had lost his parents as a teenager. They had gone out to dinner and never came back. His entire life, his parents warned to stay within the confines of the county. Venturing into the lower parts of the state were dangerous. Hunters lurked everywhere. His mother said some people saw their species as the ultimate trophy. As a result, they stayed to themselves. As a child, he recalls a human telling him to run. He ran all the way back home, out of breath. His parents hugged him and told him they were worried. A neighbor had given them a tip a hunter was the area. They were hoping someone had seen him and warned him.

As an adult, he realized he couldn’t really trust anybody. Some of his neighbors had given him some food once they realized he was alone and said they were sorry for his loss. However, he suspected someone had them tracked and found out their destination. Not long after, a neighbor had come into some money and he believed it from the death of his parents.

However, he was lonely and searched the Internet for dates. Most women failed to respond. A young woman, though, told him he was a handsome man and she didn’t care if he was a Sasquatch. She wanted to know everything about him. He fell in love with her right away. With a human by his side, he would be safe.

As he drove into her city, he experienced a sinking feeling in his stomach. It was an intolerant area who viewed him as an animal. He continued to hope she was trying to change the perception of people such as him. But once he walked into her house, he realized it was a trap. Waking up in her backyard, he saw a female Sasquatch. She was in a cage, malnourished and crying to be saved. He freed her and they escaped.

Back home, he let her move in with him. She found herself a job. His neighbor told him that she was happy he had finally found someone and invited them over for dinner.

Directors: Matt Eastin & Aaron Hymes Year: 2018

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Pam Avoledo Administrator
Pam Avoledo spends her time binge-watching classic teen dramas and stands firm in her pro-Leyton stance. She also received her journalism degree in 2006 from Oakland University. Her poetry has been published in the White Wall Review and 45 Magazine.

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